Supporting Your Son Wearing Pink Clothes to School

Supporting Your Son Wearing Pink Clothes to School

A pile of clothes littered the bedroom floor. Stuffed animals sat on bookshelves wearing my daughter's underwear after she dressed all of her furry friends in her clothes.Usually, I let the kids manage their rooms and pick up after themselves, but this time I had to intervene. The mess was at my limit. We were slipping on the books that were haphazardly strewn about the room.Opening the pine wardrobe that could house an entrance to Narnia if only it was handmade and not assembled from IKEA, I started removing clothes and assessing them for size, style, and season, sorting them into two piles: Keep and Donate.Last year's Christmas Pinkie Pie hooded sweatshirt came off the hanger, and I asked my daughter if she'd wear it again this year. She shook her head no; it was too small."I'll wear it!" My son piped up excitedly and approached the Donate pile."It's too small for you, babe. You can't wear it."Looking at me...
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There’s No Place Like Home for the Holidays

There’s No Place Like Home for the Holidays

There's no place like home for the holidays...Many people interpret home differently when they become adults. For me, home is wherever my family is.However, the definitions for both home and family have changed over the years. With each stage of life, they take on new meaning and I've shifted into different roles.When I was single, family meant my parents and my brother. I played the supportive role and helped my mom with Christmas dinner and cookies.When I was engaged-then married, my family became my partner, my immediate family, and his immediate family by extension. We brought the expensive gifts as we had two incomes, no kids, and plenty of discretionary funds to keep the economy booming.When we had kids, family became the family we created. The ones I nurtured from a cluster of cells into crying babies into adorable toddlers. They became my home, too.My role shifted from the supportive minor league player in the background to the pitcher on...
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Swedish First Grade—Room to Grow

Swedish First Grade—Room to Grow

Necessary disclaimer: I understand and acknowledge that not every school in Sweden does things the same way. This is simply a little peek into what we have experienced.I've written in the past about my children's experiences with Swedish preschool and with föreskoleklass so, now it's time for an update as the fall term of first grade comes to a close before the holidays.School day lengthWhen my son transitioned from föreskoleklass to first grade, I wasn't sure how the official school start and end times would change. His official school day starts a bit after 8 am and ends at 1 pm. He has frilek during the fritids program until I pick him up before 5 pm. Recess/Outdoor playDuring the school day, my son goes outside to play at least one time after snack (the only thing we provide). He plays outside during fritids as well and it is mandatory that everyone plays outside for a certain period of time, then they are allowed...
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Winging it in West Africa

Winging it in West Africa

Listen to Nicola narrate her chapter in Knocked Up Abroad AgainNicola Beach is a second-generation expat who has dodged bullets in Lagos, stray cats in Istanbul, got cozy in Jozi, and is currently in Hong Kong. She blogs about her family's far-flung travels at https://expatorama.com  Did you enjoy Nicola's chapter? If so, be sure to read the book and leave a review on Amazon.Continue listening to other chapters in the series here: https://knockedupabroad.com/audio...
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Where is Home?

Where is Home?

Candice Cabutihan Cipullo describes her experiences raising her kids in Japan, Canada, and the Philippines. Her chapter dives into the challenges of experiencing life while always feeling foreign and how she explains the answer to her kids when they ask her, "Where is home?"Listen to Candice narrate her chapter here.Candice Cabutihan Cipullo has a degree in child development and education. She's the author of Kaya Mo Maging Super Yaya (You can be a Super Nanny) in Filipino and English, aimed at teaching basic child development concepts to nannies and parents alike. Follow her adventures at travellingmaybahay.com Did you enjoy Candice's chapter? If so, be sure to read the book and leave a review. Continue listening to other chapters in the series here: https://knockedupabroad.com/audio...
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When the Clock Strikes…

When the Clock Strikes…

 What happens in your house when the clock strikes twelve on Halloween?  Did you like this story? If you want to know when a hard copy is published (most likely in board book format) then sign up here and I'll let you know. @import url(https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,400italic,700,700italic);/* LOADER */ .ml-form-embedSubmitLoad { display: inline-block; width: 20px; height: 20px; } .ml-form-embedSubmitLoad:after { content: " "; display: block; width: 11px; height: 11px; margin: 1px; border-radius: 50%; border: 4px solid #fff; border-color: #ffffff #ffffff #ffffff transparent; animation: ml-form-embedSubmitLoad 1.2s linear infinite; } @keyframes ml-form-embedSubmitLoad { 0% { transform: rotate(0deg); } 100% { transform: rotate(360deg); } } ...
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A Visit to a Swedish Outdoor Preschool

A Visit to a Swedish Outdoor Preschool

A wooden propeller plane makes for a great climb Cold. Uncomfortable. Rugged. Rustic. Miserable.Those are the words that I would've used to describe a Swedish outdoor preschool before I knew any better.Preschools in Sweden are for children ages 1-6 (the year they turn 6, they head off to "big school" so some kids leave when they are still 5), which in many people's perceptions, is too "young" to be exposed to the elements all day.Does outdoor preschool = miserable?Especially Swedish elements that are cold, dark, and snowy/rainy most of the school year. I imagined that the kids' fingers were freezing, toes numb, ears frostbitten, and noses all red and runny.Also, how does potty training work in the winter when you have to peel off all of those heavy layers?I really thought that only Viking-tough Swedish families aimed to send their children to outdoor preschools.The kids nap outside (not an uncommon practice and we did that too), eat outside (ok...we do picnic...
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Too Much Adventure in the Amazon

Too Much Adventure in the Amazon

Surrounded by tarantulas, snakes, falling palm trees, and undrinkable water, Lisa finds herself experiencing too much adventure in the Amazon.Click here to listen to Lisa narrate her story in Knocked Up Abroad  Be sure to read the book for more stories (and adventures) from parents around the world  Continue listening to other stories in the series here: https://knockedupabroad.com/audio...
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Knocked Up in Johannesburg

Knocked Up in Johannesburg

What did Debi experience while being pregnant and giving birth in Johannesburg, South Africa?Listen to Debi narrate her chapter in Knocked Up Abroad Again Debi Beaumont was born in Brazil and raised in the UK. Her husband was born in the UK and raised in Nigeria, Brunei, and Holland. Perhaps living abroad was in their blood because together they have lived in the UK, Australia, and South Africa. Debi has had a child in each of these countries and her experiences were hugely different each time. When she isn't busy chasing after, taxiing, and cleaning up after all of these boys, she paints and draws. She is the author and illustrator of the children's book called An Alphabet of Africa.  Did you enjoy Debi's chapter? If so, be sure to read the book and leave a review on Amazon.Continue listening to other chapters in the series here: https://knockedupabroad.com/audio...
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